Date / Time

8:20 am 27/03/2018 -

1:00 pm 28/06/2018

Location

QT Canberra, London Circuit, Canberra ACT, Australia

QT Canberra, London Circuit, Canberra ACT, Australia

Life Course Centre will present a session at the conference titled ‘Using longitudinal data to explore pathways
Presenters: Prof Mark Western – The University of Queensland, Prof Cate Taylor and Francis Mitrou – The University of Western Australia

The increase in data, and the capacity to manipulate and analyse it, has huge potential benefits to everyone involved in using “people centred data” – health, housing and community services/welfare. However, to maximise the overall benefit, to the public and to individual organisations, people across sectors and across jurisdictions need to understand what is available and how to access it. We need to cut through the ‘white noise’ of unanalysed data and work out how we can harness its power. This will require a people-centred approach that recognises data only has value when it is used to solve problems. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) and the Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG) will co-host a conference to explore a broader understanding of these issues. They will bring together public sector, university and non-government sectors to explore the issues around effective data sharing and more open use of data. Data that has the potential to improve people’s lives – whether from government, the private sector, or the community – will be subject to expert scrutiny and lively discussion.
Participants will be challenged to think more broadly about the hidden value of data sets, and the possibilities of gathering behavioural insights from the data to get a fuller picture.

Participants will be asked to consider how we can go beyond growing capability in data analytics and create a spirit of knowledge-sharing and collaboration around data in the ‘public purpose’ sector. This conference, focusing on public policy challenges and the potential to use data to solve large and small problems in service delivery, will provide a unique learning opportunity for participants. Participants will hear practical examples in using data analytics, behavioural insights, and design thinking, as well as an overview of the strategic challenges.
They will come away with a greater understanding of the power of using people-centred data to solve problems, and pathways to more effective collaboration. The growth in data shows no signs of slowing down. We need to draw on the experience of our colleagues and other experts to ensure it is used as effectively as possible for public benefit.