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Young Australian women in financial hardship are twice to three times as likely to experience violence

New research undertaken for the National Summit on Women’s Safety finds violence and unwanted sexual activity are far more common among young women experiencing financial hardship than women who are not.

It comes as the federal government has denied Australians locked down and living only on benefits such as JobSeeker the sort of extra...

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The gendered consequences of COVID-19: Life Course Centre seminar series

Women, particularly mothers of young children, are being disproportionately affected by COVID-19 in terms of negative employment, caring, and emotional and financial wellbeing outcomes. This was a key message from a presentation to the 2021 Life Course Centre seminar series by Associate Investigator, Associate Professor Leah Ruppanner of the ...

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Assessing anti-Asian attitudes in the USA and Australia

Researchers from the University of Melbourne and University of Queensland have analysed negative attitudes towards Asian people in both the United States and Australia to better understand the factors that contribute to these prejudices. The findings suggest that race-hatred in the United States can be correlated to political opinion, with mo...

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Efforts to wipe-out childhood anaemia fall short

An international study has found a global target to eradicate childhood anaemia by 2030 will fail, presenting a major public health challenge. Life Course Centre PhD candidate Md. Mehedi Hasan from The University of Queensland’s Institute for Social Science Research (ISSR) said although the results showed a considerable reduction in childhood...

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Dr Yaqoot Fatima honoured at 2021 Queensland Young Tall Poppy Science Awards

Dr Yaqoot Fatima, a Research Fellow and Life Course Centre Associate Investigator at the Institute for Social Science Research (ISSR) at The University of Queensland, has been honoured with a 2021 Queensland Young Tall Poppy Science Award.

The annual Queensland Young Tall Poppy Science Awards are hosted by the Australian Institute of P...

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Mothers and babies can be saved by controlling caesarean deliveries

A 30-year global study led by University of Queensland researchers has found rates of childbirth by caesarean section are rising and exceeding safe levels in many developing countries.

UQ’s Life Course Centre investigated rates of caesarean delivery in 74 low and middle-income countries, reporting increasing risks to the lives of mothe...

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Wealthy, educated and urban women more prone to being overweight

An international study of 55 countries has shown a marked increase in the number of overweight women globally, with wealthy, educated and urban women heavier than their counterparts.

Life Course Centre PhD candidate Md. Mehedi Hasan from The University of Queensland’s Institute for Social Science Research (ISSR) said the number of over...

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Helping educators manage behavioural challenges in early childhood services

Congratulations to Life Course Centre student Narayan Panthi, the winner of the 2021 Three Minute Thesis (3MT) heat held at the Institute for Social Science Research (ISSR) at the University of Queensland last week. Similar to last year, this year’s event was held in a virtual format via video submission due to COVID-19 lockdown and social di...

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Tips on how families can cope with school holidays spent in COVID lockdown

Life Course Centre Chief Investigator and Director of UQ’s Parenting and Family Support Centre Professor Matthew Sanders features in this ABC News article providing tips for parents to guide children through Australia's COVID-19 lockdowns during school holidays.
Psychologist advises focusing on what's within your control
Since the...

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Politicians criticising women for ‘outsourcing’ parenting need a reality check. Here it is.

During a heated exchange in a Coalition party room meeting about childcare subsidies, a male MP stated working women are “outsourcing parenting”. The notion that working mothers are failing their children is nothing new. Derived from the Victorian era, notions of women as moral guardians of the family were a way to showcase new-found wealth. ...

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