Date / Time

8:15 am 17/10/2019 -

10:00 am 17/10/2019

Location

Royal On The Park Brisbane, Alice Street, Brisbane City QLD, Australia

Royal On The Park Brisbane, Alice Street, Brisbane City QLD, Australia

RSVP

Please email: lcc@uq.edu.au to register your interest in attending.

 

The Life Course Centre invites you to attend our Anti-Poverty Week 2019 event which will focus on Education as a Pathway out of Poverty. We are delighted to be hosting two international researchers on education and equality – Professor Rebekah Levine Coley of the Lynch School of Education and Human Development at Boston College, and Dr Matteo Sandi of the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Our speakers will explore the human development and economics of education, and its role in addressing social and economic disadvantage and poverty. Their presentations will be followed by a panel discussion and the opportunity for audience questions.

We hope you can join us for this event, which coincides with the United Nations Day for the Eradication of Poverty on Thursday 17 October. This is our key event for Anti-Poverty Week 2019, running from 13-19 October, and we are proud to be a sponsor of the week and its efforts to increase awareness and understanding of poverty.

In Australia, more than 3 million people, or 13.2% of the population, live below the poverty line, including 739,000 or 1 in 6 children growing up in poverty. Anti-Poverty Week encourages us all to acknowledge these facts, engage in conversations, raise awareness, focus on positive solutions, and take action to end poverty.

The presenters

Professor Rebekah Levine Coley 

By examining how our earliest encounters with families and educational systems shape development—and how inequality affects these encounters—Rebekah Levine Coley’s work speaks to researchers, students, and community members alike. Her recent research in economic inequality builds on a career of investigating areas critical to advancing the greater good: family and community poverty; housing and community development; family structure and parenting; father involvement; early childhood education; and youth health risk behaviors. Coley is a compelling presenter on these topics, chairs and organizes multiple symposia, and serves as principal investigator on several research grants. Her work has appeared in publications as diverse as Science and Teen Vogue. A leader with several international professional associations, Coley was recently elected co-chair of the Policy and Communications Committee at the Society for Research in Child Development. She’s also co-chair of the Social Policy Committee at the Society for Research on Adolescence and a Consulting Editor with Child Development. Students working under her leadership know they’ll encounter an environment that challenges them to get beyond “academic journals that only academics read,” as Coley said in an interview. They will have and create opportunities for research that translate into real-world practice that benefits communities.

Dr Matteo Sandi is a Research Officer at the Centre for Economic Performance (LSE). Matteo joined LSE in October 2015 and his current fields of research are the economics of crime and the economics of education. He studies the determinants of crime and the crime-reducing effects of schooling, policing and public institutions. His research investigates the effectiveness for crime prevention of a variety of interventions, such as early childhood interventions, legislation changes and policing operations. Matteo also studies the use of discipline sanctions in school and their implications for students’ performance and criminal activity. Matteo completed his ESRC-funded PhD in Economics at the University of Sussex in June 2016. During his PhD, he has consulted the World Bank Group studying the impact of migration policies on labour markets and school enrolment in developing countries.